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A New Study Has Revealed That 80% of COVID-19 Patients Were Vitamin D Deficient

Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (SARS-CoV-2), The presence of pneumonia, myocarditis, microvascular thrombosis, and cytokine storms, all of which involve underlying inflammation, determines the severity of coronavirus 2019 infection (COVID-19). T regulatory lymphocytes are the primary defense against uncontrolled inflammation and viral infection in general (Tregs). Treg levels are low in many COVID-19 patients, but they can be increased with vitamin D supplementation.

Lack of Vitamin D has been linked to an increase in inflammatory cytokines and a significantly higher risk of pneumonia and viral upper respiratory tract infections. Vitamin D deficiency is linked to an increase in thrombotic episodes, which are common in COVID-19. Deficiency of vitamin D has also been linked to an increased risk of obesity and diabetes.

COVID-19 has a higher mortality rate for these conditions. Assume vitamin D reduces COVID-19 severity in terms of pneumonia/ARDS, inflammation, inflammatory cytokines, and thrombosis. In that case, we believe that supplements would be a relatively simple way to reduce the pandemic’s impact.

What Potential mechanisms are linking COVID-19 and vitamin D?

While COVID-19-specific CD8 T cells and B-cell-produced specific antibodies are critical for virus elimination, uncontrolled non-specific inflammation and cytokine release can cause a catastrophic injury to the lungs and other vital organs. As a result, reducing this early non-specific inflammation during COVID-19 may allow for the development of specific acquired immunity against COVID-19.

T regulatory lymphocytes are the primary defense against uncontrolled inflammation and viral infection in general (Tregs). Treg levels are low in one group of COVID-19 patients and ‘significantly lower in severe cases. In another study of older nursing home patients, high Treg blood levels were associated with a lower level of respiratory viral disease. These findings suggest that increasing Treg levels may be beneficial in reducing the severity of viral disease and preventing infection.